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Wednesday
Oct192011

Sha-Geezy's October Update! :)

Some great things are in the works! I've been back and forth to Atlanta working on new material, but November, I finally get to show NYC some love! For those of you outside the Tri-State, don't worry, I have a few things for you as well. 

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NYC- WALK FOR LUPUS- Saturday, Oct. 22 @ 9am- Battery Park

This Saturday is the big day! Join me and the great folk at the Alliance for Lupus Research as we participate in the NYC Walk for Lupus in Battery Park at 9am. DJ Kraff Swagger will be creating the soundtrack for the day, and there'll be free refreshments and a performance by yours truly! Hope you can make it out and/or make a donation. Anything will help, from $5 to $500. Click here to find out more information:http://walk.lupusresearch.org/goto/ShanelleGNYC2011

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Check Out My Interview!

Get to know me a lil better through my cool interview with Ms. Truth from http://sealedkiss.blogspot.com. Learn about my views on education, inspiration, and guys that get on my nerves. :)

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NYC (WITH LUPE FIASCO!)- Monday, Nov 7th: Terminal 5 (610 West 56th Street) @ 6pm

"Girl I want you to knooow, I can't get you outta my head, my head." 


Yes, I'll be performing with the Cool, the dope Lupe Fiasco as I host and feature in the Moving Minds Benefit Concert on Monday, November 7th at Terminal 5 in NYC. Also, holding it down will be fellow Brooklynite and vocal diva, Maya Azucena. Doors open at 6pm. Tickets on sale at www.transformamerica.org/tickets.


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Montclair, NJ- Saturday, Nov 19th: Memorial Auditorium, Montclair State University @ 6pm

I'm bringing the soooouuulll to the "Rock and Soul Concert," a two part concert that crosses genres.

The first part of the concert consists of the jamming rock bands Those Mockingbirds and Black Water. For the second show we will bring you soul, R&B and hip-hop by Jesse Idol, J Mello, and yours truly. I'll be performing some new music, so you can't miss this!

Tickets for the Rock Show are $15, the Soul Show are $15 and tickets for both are $22.50. Purchase them here: http://rockandsoulconcert.eventbrite.com

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As always keep checking www.shanellegabriel.com and www.twitter.com/ShanelleG for newness and updates!

 

Much love,


Sha-Geezy

Tuesday
Oct182011

Have you registered to vote????

Too many people fought for the right to have a voice; exercise this right!

Click below to register to vote! 

Thursday
Oct062011

"Is Junk Food Really Cheaper?" By Mark Bittman

THE “fact” that junk food is cheaper than real food has become a reflexive part of how we explain why so many Americans are overweight, particularly those with lower incomes. I frequently read confident statements like, “when a bag of chips is cheaper than a head of broccoli ...” or “it’s more affordable to feed a family of four at McDonald’s than to cook a healthy meal for them at home.”

This is just plain wrong. In fact it isn’t cheaper to eat highly processed food: a typical order for a family of four — for example, two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries, and two medium and two small sodas — costs, at the McDonald’s a hundred steps from where I write, about $28. (Judicious ordering of “Happy Meals” can reduce that to about $23 — and you get a few apple slices in addition to the fries!)

In general, despite extensive government subsidies, hyperprocessed food remains more expensive than food cooked at home. You can serve a roasted chicken with vegetables along with a simple salad and milk for about $14, and feed four or even six people. If that’s too much money, substitute a meal of rice and canned beans with bacon, green peppers and onions; it’s easily enough for four people and costs about $9. (Omitting the bacon, using dried beans, which are also lower in sodium, or substituting carrots for the peppers reduces the price further, of course.)

Another argument runs that junk food is cheaper when measured by the calorie, and that this makes fast food essential for the poor because they need cheap calories. But given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few, measuring food’s value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink’s value by its alcohol content. (Why not drink 95 percent neutral grain spirit, the cheapest way to get drunk?)

Besides, that argument, even if we all needed to gain weight, is not always true. A meal of real food cooked at home can easily contain more calories, most of them of the “healthy” variety. (Olive oil accounts for many of the calories in the roast chicken meal, for example.)In comparing prices of real food and junk food, I used supermarket ingredients, not the pricier organic or local food that many people would consider ideal. But food choices are not black and white; the alternative to fast food is not necessarily organic food, any more than the alternative to soda is Bordeaux.

The alternative to soda is water, and the alternative to junk food is not grass-fed beef and greens from a trendy farmers’ market, but anything other than junk food: rice, grains, pasta, beans, fresh vegetables, canned vegetables, frozen vegetables, meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, bread, peanut butter, a thousand other things cooked at home — in almost every case a far superior alternative.

“Anything that you do that’s not fast food is terrific; cooking once a week is far better than not cooking at all,” says Marion Nestle, professor of food studies at New York University and author of “What to Eat.” “It’s the same argument as exercise: more is better than less and some is a lot better than none.”

THE fact is that most people can afford real food....

(Read the rest of the article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/opinion/sunday/is-junk-food-really-cheaper.html?_r=4&ref=opinion)

Monday
Oct032011

New Video from My Homies- JusCuz: "Hold Up"

Check out my cameo in the new song from my homies, AD Odot and Young Mischief, the Hip Hop duo called "Jus Cuz." (You may remember my feature on their awesome song called "Reel Love"). A lot of cameos from some dope artists: Honey LaRochelle, PhaseOne, Tess, Vikki, Janelle Simone, and more! Shoutout to the homie Azzie of Azzie Direct Media who shot this video. I can't wait for him to direct mine! :)

Thursday
Sep292011

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know

Many prominent bloggers were asked to participate in this simple blog post to help spread awareness during Invisible Awareness Week (September 11-18th). I'm a lil late, but I still wanted to contribute, especially since many invisible illnesses, like Lupus, don't get the press or attention they deserve. 

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know

 
1. The illness I live with is: Systematic Lupus.  

2. I was diagnosed with it in the year: I was diagnosed in July 2004, right after my Sophomore year.

3. But I had symptoms since: I remember the serious ones beginning in 2003 (migranes, joint pain, stiffness in the morning, and more). I'd had many of the symptoms for a while but I chalked it up to being a college student, being achy from my dance troupe, even from being a female. But when I lost my hair in June, that's when I couldn't deny something was wrong.

4. The biggest adjustment I’ve had to make is: not being able to rip and run 24/7 the way I used to. I'd feel guilty for not helping everyone, for saying no, or for not supporting every event out there. Now I have to balance more than the average person, relying on naps and rest days to keep myself healthy. I have to listen to my body or risk being achy and flared up the next day (or few days).

5. Most people assume: that I don't have my insecurities about the illness. I worry that I will get worse, that I'll develop more accompanying complications, that I'll have trouble having kids, or that it will effect my quality of life. I stay positive and try not to let the illness take over my life, but I have my fears.

6. The hardest part about mornings are: the initial wake-up process. There are days when I'm perfectly fine, and others when it takes a mental yell to my joints to get them to move. Also, how I wake up can actually determine the kind of morning I'll have. I've been abruptly waken up or had a REALLY high anxiety dream, and woke up so tense that it put me in a flare for the whole morning even achy till the afternoon.

7. My favorite medical TV show is: House. I always get excited when they say "Maybe it's an autoimmune disease? Lupus? Start them on 60mg of Prednisone." I'm like, "Yea, I take that too!!!" lol.

8. A gadget I couldn’t live without is: my cell phone. I handle EVERYTHING with it: phone, scheduling, poem/songwriting, business, etc. I swear, I've forgotten my mom's birthday because it wasn't in my phone calendar.

9. The hardest part about nights are: not always being able to enjoy the nightlife. I wish I could party till the sun comes up, but in most cases, unless I get a serious nap in, I'm super drained for at least a day or two. My body takes so long to recover. I also hate how drained I am at the end of the day...damn near narcoleptic. 

10. Each day I take: 10 pills & vitamins. (Trying to get off of prednisone... sigh)

11. Regarding alternative treatments I: believe in a healthy combination of both. I think the idea of totally ignoring western medicine is crazy. If something goes wrong, best believe you aren't going to a herbalist. However, it's also crazy to think that an illness INSIDE of you isn't effected by our diet or an influx of meds in your system. I detox and take supplimental herbs & teas in hopes of finding a balance in my body.

12. If I had to choose between an invisible illness or visible I would choose: I would choose to have an invisible illness. In the beginning I hated telling people I had Lupus because it made some people treat me like I was an invalid. I can only imagine if it was visable. It'd be more likely to control my life. However, it does make it hard to explain to others when you're feeling sick.

13. Regarding working and career: I've become such a structured person. It helps me get work done when I need to. Also, being diagnosed with Lupus made me see how valuable life is and how important it is to do what you love. It helped me choose my career.

14. People would be surprised to know: that I have used Lupus to get myself out of some sticky situations. I don't like to do that because I feel like that puts out bad karma that will come back to bite me later.

15. The hardest thing to accept about my new reality has been: thinking of myself as a person with an illness. Prior to Lupus, I'd never even been to the ER. Except for one minor surgery, I never saw a doctor for more than a check-up and ringworm when I was 12. Now, I see my rheumatologist every month, different specialists every few months, giving everyone damn near a pint of blood each visit. I can't always get everything I want to accomplish done, and I have to think about things that "normal" 20 something year olds don't. Yet, my mind is the same healthy person it believed it was before I even knew what Lupus was. 

16. Something I never thought I could do with my illness that I did was: live a normal life. It took a while to realize that there is no such thing as a "normal" life. We are all given our own obstacles and trials to deal with, some more than others, but not without our gifts, blessings, and the ability to find light in dark situations. It's our job to take OUR lives and make it a meaningful, amazing, and love-filled experience. 

17. The commercials about my illness: There are no commercials for Lupus, but I was excited to see a few print ads throughout NYC. Lupus is the disease where many have heard of it or know someone with it, but have no clue what it is. Hopefully more awareness can happen in the future.

18. Something I really miss doing since I was diagnosed is: organized dance. It always feels like I'm putting so much strain on my body when I push it to get choreography or do too much jumping. I still take a few classes from time to time. 

19. It was really hard to have to give up: not being invincible. Many of us think we can treat our body like a machine, overwork it and play it till it's run down. It's what we're told life is. "We'll sleep when we're dead." For a person with an illness, we can't afford to treat our bodies that way. I miss the freedom of being able to just wild out, but in the same breath, I have learned the true value of optimal health and taking care of the gift God has given me: my body. 

20. A new hobby I have taken up since my diagnosis is: I'm a movie girl... Netflix is my way to relax and get lost in the plot of another world.

21. If I could have one day of feeling normal again I would: I would spend an entire day outdoors, in the sun, exercising, eating grapefruit (as much as I love it, some of my medications conflict with it), and dancing.

22. My illness has taught me: Value your health and love life!

23. Want to know a secret? One thing people say that gets under my skin is: "Why are you taking that medication? Oh, I know a cure for Lupus. Just go to this website about this doctor in the East Congo/ France/ India/ etc." I'm so tired of people, who aren't medical doctors, trying to tell me what I'm doing wrong and that they know how to make everything ALL go away. While I do practice elements of Eastern/Alternative medicine, I cannot completely abandon Western medicine. I know you mean well but stop trying to fix me, people!

24. But I love it when people: open up to me. I appreciate the kind words, the understanding, the laughs, the deep discussions. It doesn't just have to be about Lupus. Sometimes just remembering how a like we all are can brighten my day.

25. My favorite motto, scripture, quote that gets me through tough times is: "There is always someone out there who has it worse than you do; count all of your blessings." Puts things in perspective.

26. When someone is diagnosed I’d like to tell them: to learn how to listen to their bodies (it'll let you know when to expect a flare), to make sure they fully take an active role in understanding & managing their disease, never be afraid to go to the doctor, and to always stay positive. The mind is a powerful thing. 

27. Something that has surprised me about living with an illness is: that you can actually LIVE with one. So many people think life ends when bad things happen, but there is SO MUCH worth living for. I really value every moment I get and I'm proud of how strong I've been in dealing with this disease. I surprise myself constantly.

28. The nicest thing someone did for me when I wasn’t feeling well was: surprised me with a massage. I thought we were just going to hang out and I ended up at a spa. My joints felt so amazing afterwards.  

29. I’m involved with Invisible Illness Week because: so many people ask me questions about this disease. Although I'm a week late, I still want to do my part in spreading awareness that you don't have to look ill to be ill. Also, I want people to know that just because you're ill, doesn't mean you have to live your life as a sickly person.

30. The fact that you read this list makes me feel: optimistic!